The Right to Communicate in Theory and Practice: A Test for the World Summit on the Information Society (2003)

The state of current human rights provisions for the information society is the central concern of this lecture. A key argument will be that international human rights law does not provide for a right to communicate. This right refers to communication as an interactive process, as public and private dialogue. The recognition of this human right would demonstrate that the protection of the freedom to engage in dialogue is seen as essential to human dignity. The forthcoming United Nations World Summit on the Information Society will be challenged to extend the present human rights regime with the right to communicate.

Transcript : The Right to Communicate in Theory and Practice: A Test for the World Summit on the Information Society (2003)